Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Escalation in Digital Sleuthing Raises Quandary in Classrooms - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Escalation in Digital Sleuthing Raises Quandary in Classrooms - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Key passage from article:

A Writing Problem


Some researchers point to better teaching, not technology, as the key to preventing plagiarism.

Ms. Howard is a leader of the Citation Project, a national study of 174 student papers from 16 colleges and universities. The project, conducted in collaboration with Sandra Jamieson, chair of the English department at Drew University, brings data to claims about student writing by studying how students use the texts they cite. What it has uncovered so far is "not happy news," she says.

Students are "dragging sentences out of random, simplistic sources and pasting them together in an often incomprehensible pastiche" of sentences, Ms. Howard said in presenting the data at a conference this year.

"How much plagiarism goes away if students actually know how to read and write from sources?" she asks The Chronicle. "My guess is: a lot."

No comments:

Post a Comment

Post a Comment